MASSEY-HARRIS TRACTORS



DANIEL MASSEY  Daniel Massey founded the Newcastle Foundry and Machine Manufactory, C.W. (Canada West) in 1847 in Newcastle, Ontario. The company began by repairing items, making simple implements and doing custom casting. However, the company grew rapidly and eventually produced a wide variety of items such as wheelbarrows, lathes, iron and wood planes, parlor and cook stoves, stump pullers, horse powers, feed choppers, grist mills, hay rakes, reapers, dredges, and steam engines and boilers. Harvesting equipment such as the Woods’ Self-Rake Reaper, the Massey Reel Rake Harvester, and the Toronto Light Binder, which incorporated a twine sheaf binding mechanism with the Appleby Knotter, were very popular. The firm produced some of the world’s first mechanical threshers. In 1863 the name of the company was changed to the Newcastle Agricultural works and in 1870 the name was changed again to the Massey Manufacturing Company. The company moved to new, large factory in Toronto in 1879. Two factors contributed to the company’s rapid growth: there was an acute labor shortage and Canadian tariffs prevented U.S. firms from competing in Canada.

ALANSON HARRIS  In 1857, Alanson Harris purchased a small foundry in Beamsville and began producing tools such as hand rakes and pitch forks under the name A. Harris, Son & Company, Ltd. The company was very successful and expanded rapidly, eventually making farm implements such as a “flop-over” hay rake, the Kirby Mower and Reaper, the Osborne Rake-Reel Reaper which rivaled the Ketchum Mower manufactured by Massey, and an open-end binder. Business was so good that a new factory was built in Brantford, Ontario, in 1872.

THE MASSEY-HARRIS COMPANY  Competition over reaping machines led to a merger of the Massey Company and the Harris Company in 1891, creating the Massey-Harris Company, Ltd.--the largest agricultural equipment maker in the British Empire.  The Massey-Harris Company produced reaper-threshers, combines, plows, disc, wagons, manure-spreaders, etc., which were sold worldwide.

The Massey Manufacturing Company and the A. Harris Company did not invent many of the implements they produced; they acquired them by purchasing production rights from other companies or by purchasing the companies outright. This continued a practice which both companies had engaged in since their founding. In1892 MH purchased a 40% interest in the L.D. Sawyer Company. The Sawyer-Massey Company was Canada’s largest producer of agricultural steam engines and threshing equipment. Massey-Harris withdrew from this arrangement in 1910.  Other firms and products acquired by Massey-Harris included the Patterson Wisner Company in 1891, the Corban Disc Company of Prescott, Ontario, in 1893, the Kemp Manure Spreader Company in 1904, the Deyo-Macey Company of Binghamton New York (gasoline engines),  in 1910, the Patterson Wisner Company in 1910, and the Johnson Harvester Company in Batavia, New York, in 1910.  With the acquisition of the Jonson Harvester Company, Massey-Harris became an international firm. Other arrangements included the acquisition of exclusive marketing rights from the Verity Plow Company of Exeter, Ontario, in 1892, and the acquisition of the Bain Company (wagons and sleighs) as a subsidiary in 1895. The production equipment of the Deyo-Macey Company was moved from New York to a new factory in Weston Toronto; this later became the first Massey-Harris Tractor Factory.

THE MH NO 1 REAPER-THRESHER  Massey-Harris developed a combine based on the type perfected by Benjamin Holt of Stockton, California; this was marketed in 1910 as the Massey-Harris No. 1 Reaper-Thresher. There were seven variations of this reaper-thresher produced between 1910 and 1926; all but No. 5 were ground-wheel driven. Reaper-Thresher No. 5, introduced in 1922, incorporated an engine to drive the mechanism. These implements could be pulled either by horses or tractors.

THE BULL  In 1916, Massey-Harris acquired the rights to sell the Big Bull tractor in Canada. The Big Bull tractor was a three-wheeled machine made by the Bull Tractor Company in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Bull tractors were built under contract by the Minneapolis Steel and Machinery Company, which also built Twin-City tractors. The two-cylinder, opposed, L-head engine operated at 750 RPM and produced 12 HP at the drawbar and 24 HP at the belt pulley; the engines were first made by the Gile Engine Company of Ludington, Michigan, but a separate company—the Toro Manufacturing Company—was formed to make the engines. The Big Bull tractor was a failure. It was underpowered and unreliable. Also, the Fordson tractor had just been introduced and it was lighter, cheaper and more reliable. The Big Bull tractor was only sold by the Massey-Harris Company from late 1916 through 1917.

Parrett 12-20THE PARRETT  In 1918, the Massey-Harris Company contracted with the Parrett Tractor Company of Chicago to acquire the rights to build and sell tractors in Canada under the Massey-Harris name. Three models were produced in the Weston, Ontario, plant before production ended in 1923. The Massey-Harris No. 1 was introduced in 1919; it was identical to the Parrett No. 3.  The Massey-Harris No. 2 appeared in 1920; it was the Model 1 with the addition of a two speed transmission, a belt guide, and shielding to keep dirt out of the final-drive gears. Models 1 and 2 had four-cylinder, Model HTU engines built by Buda; these operated at 1,000 RPM and produced 12 HP at the drawbar and 22 HP at the belt pulley. The Model 3 came out in 1922, with a larger Buda engine capable of producing 15 HP at the drawbar and 28 HP at the belt pulley. The radiator on the Model 3 was moved to a more conventional transverse position. The Massey-Harris Models 1, 2 and 3 engines used gasoline. Massey-Harris Models 1 and 2 were priced at $1,200; the Model 3 sold for $1,400. Unfortunately, the Massey-Harris tractors were based on old designs and were soon outdated by tractors made by other companies, such as he Fordson, which was introduced in 1918, and the IHC Farmall, all-purpose tractor was released in 1924. The ensuing price rice war caused Parrett to go bankrupt and the Weston factory closed in 1923. A total of 572 Models 1,2 and 3 were produced  between 1918 and 1923.

THE SAWYER-MASSEY COMPANY  The Massey-Harris Company acquired a 40% interest in the L.D. Sawyer and Company of Hamilton, Ontario, in 1892. The company was renamed the Sawyer-Massey Company and it became one of the largest producers of threshing machines and steam traction engines. Following a dispute in 1910, the Massy-Harris Company withdrew from the agreement. After the dissolutionment of the agreement, the Sawyer-Massey Company began to build gasoline tractors and produced five models under the Sawyer-Massey name--the Model 22/45, built from 1911 to 1917, the Model 27/50 (an upgrade of the Model 22/45) and built from 1918 to 1922, the Model 20/40, built from 1916 to 1921, the Model 11/22 and the Model 17/34 which were introduced in 1918, upgraded to become the Model 12/25 and the Model 18/35 in 1920, and produced until 1922. The Sawyer-Massey Company did not build tractors after 1922.

The Massey-Harris Company withdrew from the tractor market from 1923 to 1926.

Wallis TractorTHE WALLIS 20/30  In 1926, Massy-Harris negotiated with the J.I. Case Plow Company of Racine, Wisconsin, to sell the Wallis line of tractors in Canada. These tractors incorporated the “U: (washtub) type of frame. A curved, boiler-plate frame served as the crankcase as well as the frame. Massey-Harris obtained the rights to sell the Wallis Certified 20/30 tractor in Canada and some states in the U.S. Each owner was given a certificate verifying that the tractor had undergone factory inspection and met test standards. The Wallis Certified 20/30 had a four-cylinder,  valve-in-head engine that operated at 1,000 RPM; the engine featured replaceable cylinder sleeves and utilized gasoline, kerosene or distillate. As indicated by the model number, the engine was capable of producing 20 HP at the drawbar and 30 HP at the belt pulley. The engine was linked to a two-speed transmission and a belt pulley. Options included extension rims, skid bands for the front wheels, a PTO, a radiator screen, a hand brake, a generator and lights, wheel scrapers, and a swinging drawbar. The base price of the Model 20/30 was $1,125 in 1932. This was an excellent tractor and it sold well.

THE J.I. CASE PLOW COMPANY  In 1928, Massey-Harris purchased the J.I. Case Plow Company and reorganized and incorporated the company as the Massey-Harris Company. The Case name was sold to the J.I. Case Threshing Machine Company, who made Case tractors.  Massey-Harris continued  to  sell tractors under the Wallis name until 1932.

THE WALLIS 12/20  In 1929, a scaled-down version of the Wallis 20/30 tractor was introduced—the Wallis Certified 12/20 . The Wallis Model 12/20 was produced and distributed from 1929-1935; however, it was called the Massey-Harris Model 12 after 1932. It was a two-plow tractor, available in regular and orchard models. In 1932, the standard model was priced at $875; the price of the orchard model was $905. Like the Model 20/30, the tractor had a four-cylinder, valve-in-head engine that operated at 1,000 RPM and could operate on gasoline, kerosene or distillate. As indicated by the model number, the Model 12/20 produced 12 HP at the drawbar and 30 HP at the belt pulley.The tractor featured a three-speed transmission and ball and roller bearings throughout. Options included extension rims, skid bands for the front wheels, a PTO, a generator and lights, wheel scrapers, and a swinging drawbar.

THE H.V. MACKAY COMPANY  In 1930, Massey-Harris signed a 25-year contract with the H.V. MacKay Company in Australia to sell Massey-Harris tractors and implements in that country. Massey-Harris tractors sold in Australia carried decals with the name “Sunshine,” the trade name of the MacKay Company, under the Massey-Harris name.

Massey-Harris 15/22THE MODEL 15/22 GP 4WD  In 1930, Massey-Harris introduced the Model 15/22 GP (General Purpose) four-wheel-drive tractor.  This was the first tractor developed by Massey-Harris engineers, it was the first four-wheel-drive tractor produced by a major tractor manufacturer, and it was the first Massey-Harris tractor to offer an electric starting motor and a generator and lights as options. The GP did not provide adjustable wheel spacing; however, it could be purchased with 48, 60, 66 or 76 inch wheel spacing from the factory. The tractor featured 30 inches of clearance. The 1936 improved version was simply known as the Four-Wheel -Drive (4-WD) Model. The Model 15/22 was the first Massey-Harris tractor to incorporate a vendor-built engine; this was the Hercules Model OOC, L-head, four-cylinder engine that operated at 1,200 RPM and produced 16 HP at the drawbar and 25 HP at the belt pulley. In 1936, the Hercules OCC side-valve engine was replaced with the Hercules OHC engine with overhead valves; however, that neither increased the tractor's power nor its sales significantly. Most tractors were sold with four-cylinder engines; a few were outfitted with six-cylinder engines. The Model 15/22 was fueled by gasolene.The tractor was basically designed for agricultural use; however, orchard, railroad, golf-course and industrial models were also available—some with rubber tires. A three-speed transmission, a belt pulley and a swinging drawbar were standard. Orchard models had fenders. Options included rubber tires, a generator and lights, an electric starting motor, a muffler, a PTO, a power lift, wheel weights, several choices of wheel rims, and extension controls to permit operation from a drawn implement. The base price of the Model 15/22 in 1933 was $995, for all wheel widths. The Model 15/22 had great traction, but it was not suitable for row-crop work and it was not popular. Although the tractor was advanced for its time, it was underpowered, clumsy, and hard to maneuver. Farmers purchased crawlers or tractors with bigger engines instead of the Model 15/22. Also, the Great Depression caused farmers to be more interested in smaller, cheaper tractors or tractors with tricycle front wheels for row-crop work. IHC’s Farmall models were especially popular. Somewhat less than 3,000 unstyled and 1,000 styled Model 15/22 tractors were built before production ended in 1938.


THE MODEL 25  In 1931, the Wallis 20/30 was updated and given a 26/40 rating. This model became the Massey-Harris Model 25 in 1934, and at that time the old Wallis gray color was replaced by Massey-Harris’ new dark-green color, with red wheels. The Model 25 was styled from 1938 to 1940, when production ended. Massey-Harris produced its own engine for this tractor--the Model 25--a four-cylinder, valve-in-head engine with lightweight pistons and replaceable cylinder sleeves;that operated at 1,200 RPM and produced 24.92 HP at the drawbar and 44.24 HP at the belt pulley. The blocks were probably cast by the Continental Company. The engine could utilize gasolene, kerosene, or distillate.The Massey-Harris Model 25 had three forward speeds, an oil bath air cleaner, cut and hardened steel gears, roller bearings, an improved transmission, and a 540 RPM. Standard equipment included fenders, a radiator screen, rear-wheel scrapers (steel wheels), and a belt pulley. Options included rubber tires, larger tires, skid bands for the front wheels (steel wheels), a cowhide seat cover, a cushion seat with a backrest, a PTO, a swinging drawbar, a belt guide, and extension rims. The Model 25 with steel wheels sold for $1,275; with rubber tires, the price was $1,530. A total of 14,112 unstyled and approximately 1,000 styled Model 25 tractors were manufactured between 1933 and 1940.

STYLED TRACTORS  In 1936, the entire line of Massey-Harris tractors began to be restyled. A rounded-shroud was adopted and new red and yellow colors replaced the green formerly used. A choice of engines was offered—gasoline or gasoline and kerosene. Tractors with gasoline engines had Twin Power (see below), optional power lifts, new magnetos, and improved cooling fans and pumps. Low-ratio or high-ratio transmissions were also available.  

TWIN-POWER  “Twin-Power” was introduced in 1937; this allowed the operator to move a lever and increase the engine speed from 1,200 RPM for drawbar work to 1,400 RPM for belt work. This also provided an additional 5-10 HP. At the higher speed, the transmission was locked in neutral to avoid placing too much stress on gears and bearings.  The Twin Power feature was only available on tractors fueled by gasoline.

THE PACEMAKER/CHALLENGER  In 1936, the Model 12/20 was improved and renamed the Pacemaker Model PA; a row crop version was called the Challenger CH. The Pacemaker was unstyled in 1936 and 1937 and styled from 1937 to 1939. The Challenger was also introduced in 1936; it was the company’s first true row-crop tractor. It had close-set front wheels and the 52-inch diameter rear wheels provided 25 inches of crop clearance. The rear wheels could be adjusted from 52 to 80 inches. Both the Pacer and the Challenger were transitional tractors; they were amongst the last ones incorporating the U-frame design of the earlier Wallis tractors. Standard or orchard versions were available, and they could be purchased with either steel wheels or rubber tires. The engines were designed and manufactured by Massey-Harris; although, the blocks were cast by the Continental Company. The Pacemaker and Challenger had valve-in-head four-cylinder engines that operated at 1,200 RPM and produced 16.21 HP at the drawbar and 26.69 HP at the belt pulley. Early engines operated on gasoline, kerosene or distillate. Late Pacer and Challenger models with the Twin Power feature were limited to operating on gasolene. The Challenger had individual rear-wheel brakes. The styled versions of both tractors were red, with straw-yellow wheels. A PTO driven, foot activated implement lift was available. Standard models were fueled by distillate. Fenders, a belt pulley, brakes, a radiator screen, and a swing drawbar were standard. Options included a cowhide seat cover, a cushion seat with a backrest, a PTO, lights and a generator, and extension rims. Unfortunately, the basic design of the Pacemaker and the Challenger tractors was outdated and the tractors had a number of mechanical problems. A total of 2,837 Pacemakers and 3,366 Challengers were manufactured before production of ended in 1937.

By 1938, the Massey-Harris Company was among the top five companies in the tractor industry.

In 1938, a Pacemaker cost $1,140, a Challenger cost $1,1850, a 4-WD GP cost $1,505, and a Model 25 cost $1,530. However, the best-selling tractors in 1938 were the IHC Farmall F-14, the Allis-Chalmers B, the John Deere B, the John Deere H, and the Case R. All cost less than $1,000--some less than $700. This led to the introduction of the Massey-Harris Model 101, the Model 101 Super and the Model 101 Junior. The Model 101 Series was intended to compete with the Ford-Ferguson 9N.  

CONTINENTAL ENGINES  The Massey-Harris Company  began to use engines produced by the Continental Company during the 1930's. At first, Massey-Harris purchased only cast blocks and assembled the engines in their own factory; however, the company soon began purchasing complete engines. The Continental Company used the same block and bored it out to the desired displacement. For example, the 124, 140, and 162 cubic-inch engines were all based on the same block. This allowed owners to replace engines in their tractors with engines that were more powerful and up-to-date, and this was viewed as a significant reason for buying a Massey-Harris tractor with a Continental engine.

THE MODEL 101 AND 101 SUPER  Up to 1938, all Massey-Harris tractors were based on designs developed by other companies. The Model 101 was Massey-Harris’ own design. The Massey-Harris Model 101 was a beautiful tractor with chrome striping and fully-louvered side panels. The louvered side-panels were not popular and farmers usually removed them; they were replaced by round hood cutouts in late 1941. At that time, the air cleaner was moved from behind the grill to the side of the engine. In 1939, the Model 101 was renamed the Model 101 Super. From 1938 to 1942, the Model 101 was equipped with a six-cylinder, heavy-duty, industrial, 201.3 cubic-inch, L-head Chrysler engine which produced 31.5 HP at the drawbar and 40 HP at the belt pulley. From 1940 to 1942, the engine was replaced by one with 217.7 cubic-inches, which increased the power to 34.6 HP at the drawbar and 47 HP at the belt pulley. These engines operated normally at 1,500 RPM and 1,800 RPM for belt work and in road gear. The Models 101 and 101 Super were two/three plow models; they operated on gasoline. From 1938 and 1942, when production ended,  5,106 standard and 5,016 row-crop Model 101 and Model 101 Super tractors were built.     

THE MODEL101 SENIOR  The Model 101 Senior was an upgrade of the Model 101 Super; a heavy-duty, industrial, six-cylinder, 226 cubic-inch Continental engine replaced the earlier Chrysler engine. The Model 102, which utilized kerosene, had a 244 cubic-inch engine which operated at 1,600 RPM and 1,900 RPM. Early Model 101's produced in 1938 can be differentiated from later models by their separate left and right brake pedals placed on the left and right foot platforms. These early models also had flattop fenders, a chrome hood badge, and cast rear wheels. Standard equipment included an electric starter and generator, a thermostat, fenders, operator platform, an instrument panel with ammeter, oil and water temperature gauges, a combined power lift and PTO, a belt pulley, and a swinging drawbar. Options included a power lift, a PTO extension, and lights. The Model 101 was produced from 1938 to 1942. In 1945, a standard Model 101 with rubber tires cost $1,371.25 and the row-crop model with rubber tires was priced at $1,292. Production records indicate that 4,723 Model 101 Senior standard version tractors with gasoline engines were built between 1942 and 1946, 2,417 Model 102 Senior standard version tractors with kerosene engines were built between 1941 and 1945, 12,483  Model 102 Senior row-crop versions with gasoline engines were built between 1942 and 1946, and 283 Model 102 Senior row-crop versions with kerosene engines were built between 1942 and 1943. 

THE MODEL 101 JUNIOR  The Model 101, with a four-cylinder engine was, offered in 1939 as the Model 101Junior. At that time, the six-cylinder Model 101 was renamed the Model 101 Super. The Model 101 Junior had a heavy-duty, industrial, 123.7 cubic-inch, Continental L-head engine which produced 20.4 HP at the drawbar and 26.2 HP at the belt pulley and operated at 1,500 RPM and 1,800 RPM (belt pulley and road gear). This was the same engine used in the Cockshutt 20, the Co-op E3 and the Oliver Super 44. In 1940, the 123.7 cubic-inch engine was replaced by one with 140 cubic inches, which increased the power to 24.6 HP at the drawbar and 26.2 HP at the belt pulley. In 1943, the 140 cubic-inch engine was replaced by an engine with 162 cubic inches. The 101 Junior was manufactured from 1939 to 1946. Production during that period included 8,632 Model 101 Junior standard version tractors with gasoline engines, 4,724 Model 101 Junior standard version tractors with kerosene engines, 12,133 Model 102 Junior row-crop versions with gasoline engines, and 2,163 Model 102 Junior row-crop versions with kerosene engines. 

THE MODEL 101 SERIES  The success of the Model 101 Series eventually led to the development of Models 102, 201, 202 and 203, plus 81 and 82 and, for a brief period, the General tractor. The Model 101 Senior and 101 Junior replaced the Pacemaker and the Challenger and the Model 25 was replaced by the Models 201 and 202 in 1941. The Model 102 Junior was introduced with an engine that utilized kereosene. When kerosene went out of favor as a fuel, Model 102 Juniors were outfitted with gasoline engines and distributed as export models. None of the Model 101 Series tractors had Massey-Harris engines. Models 101, 101 Super and 201 had Chrysler or Dodge heavy-duty, industrial, L-head six-cylinder gasoline engines; all other models had four or six-cylinder Continental engines. The Chrysler and Dodge engines were truck engines and they were noted for being very smooth-running and quiet. Service was available for these engines from either Chrysler dealers or Massey-Harris dealers. An electric-start motor was standard in the Model 101--an industry first. The Models 101 Junior, Super, and Senior were mainstays during the war years. All were mounted in conventional cast frames. The Twin-Power feature provided 1,500 RPM as a normal operating speed, with 1,800 RPM for belt power. Tractors with a fourth gear were able to utilize the faster engine speed to achieve a road speed of almost 20 MPH. The Chrysler and Dodge engines operated at one-half the speed of comparable engines in trucks; however, they still had a great deal of torque and remained smooth-running and quiet. Continental engines had some advantages over Chrysler and Dodge engines, in that Continental engines had replaceable cylinder sleeves and the Continental Company was willing to customize engines for Massy-Harris. The Massey-Harris Company had to choose from existing engines available from Chrysler and Dodge. 

Tractors in the Model 101 Series were available in standard or row-crop versions. Row-crop tractors had adjustable rear-wheel spacing and individual rear-wheel brakes. Model 101 Series tractors had fenders, individual brakes, thermostats, operator platforms, belt pulleys, internal PTO shafts, coil ignition systems and electric starters, instrument panels with gauges, and swinging drawbars. Options included power lifts, PTO extensions, lights, a muffler, a single front wheel, and an adjustable wide axle. Model 101 production ended in 1942.

THE CLETRAC GENERAL GG  Tractors in the Model 101 Series were too large to replace horses on farms with less than 100 acres, and this was the biggest market in the early 1940’s.  The CLETRAC General GG, a small, one-plow tractor built by the Cleveland Tractor Company (CLETRAC) was marketed in Canada from 1939 to 1942 by Massey-Harris with the CLETRAC yellow paint and without the Massey-Harris name. The CLETRAC General GG was based on the CLETRAC HG crawler. The General GG utilized a four-cylinder, 113.12 cubic-inch Hercules IXA or IXK engine which operated at 1,400 RPM and produced 12.5 HP at the drawbar and 18 HP at the belt pulley. The CLETRAC General GG had a Thermo-Siphon cooling system, a two-speed transmission, and a crank for starting the engine. The General GG was also sold in the United States by Montgomery-Ward as the Montgomery-Ward Twin-Row Tractor. Massey-Harris stopped marketing the General in 1942 after the Massey-Harris Model 81 tractor was introduced in 1941. The Cleveland Tractor Company eventually sold the General GG  to the B.F. Avery Company in Louisville, Kentucky, and that company marketed the tractor as the Avery Model A. 

THE MODEL 81  The Massey-Harris Model 81 and the distillate-burning Model 82 were much the same as that used in the early Model 101 Junior. A PTO and belt pulley were options. The Models 81 and 82 were two-plow tractors which used the same heavy-duty, industrial, 124 cubic-inch Continental L-head engine that had been used in the early Model 101 Junior tractor; this engine produced 20.8 HP at the drawbar and 28 HP at the belt pulley. Models 81 and 82 operated at a regular speed of 1,500 RPM, with 1,800 RPM available for belt pulley work and road gear. The Model 81 utilized gasoline; the Model 82 used distillate.  The Models 81 and 82 tractors were lighter tractors than the earlier Model 101 Junior. Standard equipment included a power lift, fenders, a belt pulley, a PTO, a belt pulley, lights, a muffler, a single front wheel, an adjustable front axle, and wheel weights. Production of Models 81 and 82 ended in 1948.  In 1945, the price of a Model 81 Standard with rubber  tires was $833; the Model  81 Row-Crop was priced at $803. From 1941 to 1946, production included 2,573 Model 81 standard version tractors with gasoline engines, 1,158 Model 82 standard version tractors with kerosene engines, 6,601 Model 81 row-crop version tractors with gasoline engines, and 424 Model 82 row-crop version tractors with kerosene engines.

THE HARVEST BRIGADE  The first Massey-Harris self-propelled combine was the MH-20, built in 1939. This was replaced in 1940 by the #21 SP (self-propelled). During the late 1930’’s and the war years,  the Massey-Harris Company was very successful in selling combines, in part because the company produced quality machines which were popular, and partly because it convinced the United States Government to provide the company with enough steel to build 500 more Model 21A combines than the company’s allotment of 1,300. These machines were sold to custom operators who guaranteed to harvest, under Massey-Harris supervision, at least 2,000 acres and 15,000,000 bushels of grain as part of a Harvest Brigade of combines which would start in the southern United States in April and work their way north to Canada by September. Fuel, tires and parts were placed strategically along the routes, Massey-Harris representatives searched for ripening fields by car and airplane ahead of the Brigade, repair parts were flown in when needed, and organizers used radios to coordinate the entire effort . The combines made short moves under their own power; the machines were loaded onto semi trucks for longer moves. This was a highly successful venture; by October the goals had been exceeded and some 25,000,000 bushels of wheat, oats, flax, barley, alfalfa, sorghum, peas, beans, corn, lettuce seeds, beet seeds and carrot seeds had been harvested.

THE MODEL 201  The Massey-Harris Model 201 was introduced in 1940 as a big plowing tractor for use on Western Canada’s plains and the United States wheat belt. The Model 201 was available only as a standard version. It had a heavy-duty, industrial, L-head, 241.5 cubic-inch, six-cylinder, Chrysler engine that operated at 1,700 RPM for regular drawbar work and 2,000 RPM for belt work and road gear. The Model 201 was rated as a four-plow tractor, It had a four-speed transmission and left and right brakes that could be locked together. Some tractors were built with high-compression cylinder heads and smaller carburetor jets for use at higher altitudes.  The Model 201 had a heavy, cast-iron grill. Production of the Model 201 ended in 1942. The Massey-Harris Model 202 was introduced in 1940. It was essentially the same tractor as the Model 201, with the exception that it had a larger, 290 cubic-inch, L-head, six-cylinder Continental engine and was rated as a five-plow tractor. The Model 202 was built between 1940 and 1942.  The Massey-Harris Model 203 was built from 1940 to 1947. It was the distillate equivalent of the gasoline-burning Model 202 and it had a large, 330 cubic-inch, L-head, six-cylinder Continental engine. A gasoline-burning version of the Model 203 was introduced in 1944. The Model 201 cost $1,740 in 1941, the Model 202 cost $1,745 in 1941, and the Model 203 cost $1,895 in 1945. From 1940 to 1942, 503 Model 201 tractors and 223 Model 202 tractors were produced; from 1940 to 1947, 2,957 Model 203 tractors were built.

Massey-Harris production was confusing in 1942, because engines and transmissions were difficult to obtain and the company purchased them wherever and whenever they could. Engines and transmissions were combined them in a variety of different ways. The company was forced to use truck engines, and these were not satisfactory because they consumed excessive fuel and lacked appropriate torque and speed characteristics. By 1943, the company’s production had been standardized into the Models 81 and 82, 101 and102 Junior, 101 and102 Senior and 203.

THE MODEL 10  The Massey-Harris Model 10 was built from 1946 to 1948; it was identical to the Model 81, built from 1941 to 1946.  The Model 10 was a two-plow tractor available in row-crop and or standard versions, with a choice of gasoline or distillate engines. The Model 10 was the first Massey-Harris tractor to be released with the Depth-O-Matic hydraulic-lift system as an option. This system was not as good as the Ferguson system, because it did not provide draft control and the hydraulic components were an external addition. The Pitt tractor of 1953 was an experimental tractor with a new attachment and control arrangement; it was not successful and was abandoned within a few months.


THE MODEL 20  The Massey-Harris Model 20 was built from 1946 to 1948. It was introduced to commemorate the Massey-Harris Company’s 100th Anniversary. The Model 20 was identical to the old Model 81, which had been built from 1941 to 1946--only the name and the price were different. The Model 20 had a heavy-duty, industrial, L-head, 124 cubic-inch, four-cylinder Continental engine, that utilized gasoline and produced 20.8 HP at the drawbar and 27 HP at the belt-pulley. This engine operated at a regular speed of 1,500 RPM, but an increased speed of1,800 RPM speed was available for belt-work and road gear. The Model 20 could be purchased with a 140 cubic-inch, distillate engine. The Model 20 was offered in row-crop and standard versions; it was comparable to the Ford and Ferguson tractors which were being marketed at that time. Standard equipment included rubber tires, a starter and generator, an instrument panel with gauges, an air cleaner, an oil filter, a thermostat, a swing drawbar, an operator's platform and rear-tread which was adjustable from 48 to 88 inches. Options included a Velvet-Ride seat, a belt-pulley, a PTO, a power lift, lights, a muffler, and an adjustable, high-arch front axle.The retail price of a Massey-Harris Model 20 in 1947 was $1,296. During the period from 1946 to 1948, 7,931 Model 20 tractors were manufactured--1,660 standard versions with gasoline engines, 1,430 standard versions with kerosene engines, 4,198 row-crop versions with gasoline engines, and 643 row-crop versions with kerosene engines.

Massey-Harris 30THE MODEL 30  The Massey-Harris Model 30 was a two/three-plow tractor built from 1947 to 1953. Itt replaced the Model 101 Junior as part of the new line of Massey-Harris tractors introduced for the Massey-Harris Company's 100th Anniversary. The Model 30 was a new design; although, it had the same Continental engine and Twin-Power feature as the Model 101. The engine was a heavy-duty, industrial, L-head, 162 cubic-inch, four-cylinder engine that utilized gasoline and produced 26.24 HP at the drawbar and 34.18 HP at the belt-pulley.This engine operated at a regular speed of 1,500 RPM, with a faster speed of 1,800 RPM speed available for belt-work and road gear. The Model 30 could be purchased with a distillate engine. Standard equipment included a five-speed transmission, a starter and generator, a Velvet-Ride seat, fenders, a muffler, and a belt-pulley. Options included a hydraulic lift, a PTO, lights, a single front wheel, a high-arch adjustable wide front axle, extra-long axles to achieve a 112-inch wide tread, an hour meter, rear-wheel weights, and front-wheel weights.The color of the engine was changed from black to red in 1948. The Model 30 was a popular tractor and sold well. In 1951, the Standard version of the Model 30 was priced at $1,832; the price of the Row-Crop version was $1,754. From 1946 to 1953, 32,418 Model 30 tractors were manufactured.

Massey-Harris PonyTHE MODEL 11 PONY  In 1946 and 1947, a new line of tractors was introduced, based on the company’s previous offerings with some additions. The Model 11 Pony was produced 1947 to 1957; it was designed to compete with the John Deere Model L, the Allis-Chalmers Model G, and the Farmall Cub. It turned out that Ford and Ferguson tractors were also strong competitors. The Pony was very successful on truck gardens, estates, and golf courses, and for utility work on large farms. The Pony built in Woodstock, Ontario, was a one-plow tractor with a three- speed transmission and a heavy-duty, industrial, 62 cubic-inch, Continental four-cylinder, L-head engine—the same engine used in the Allis-Chalmers Model G. This engine produced 10 HP on the drawbar and 11 HP on the belt pulley and the PTO and it operated at a regular speed of 1,800 RPM, with 1,990 RPM available for belt work .  Rubber tires, fenders, a starter and a muffler were standard equipment; options included a spring-loaded hand implement lift, a hydraulic implement lift, a PTO, a belt pulley, an improved drawbar, wheel weights, and lights. A number of mounted implements were designed and produced just for this tractor, including a plow, a cultivator, a front blade, a sickle-mower, a planter, a disk, a front-loader, etc. The Massey-Harris Model 11 Pony sold for $838 in 1951--$854 with an adjustable front axle. From 1947 to 1957, 28,746 Model 11 Ponies were built.

THE MODEL 811 PONY  The Pony was very popular in France. Models 811, 812, 820, and 821 were built in Marquette-lez-Lille, France, from 1951 to 196l. The Model 811 was produced only in 1951; it was replaced by the Model 812 which was built through 1957 and, in turn, the Model 812 was replaced by the Model 820 and 821 until production ended in 1961. The Model 820 had a gasoline engine; the Model 820D was a diesel tractor. Simca engines were used in the Model 820 and 820D tractors; these engines produced almost fifty-percent more power than the Continental engine. The Hanomag engine was used in the Model 821 tractor. The Simca was a four-cylinder, overhead-valve, 1221 cubic-centimeter engine that operated at 1,000 RPM and 1,800 RPM and produced a maximum of 15 HP. The Hanomag was a two-cylinder,10211 cubic-centimeter, two-cycle diesel engine built in Germany.; it operated at 1,800 RPM and produced 18 HP. The Simca had a Thermo-Siphon cooling system; the Hanomag had a water pump and thermostat. Standard equipment for the Models 811, 1812, 820, and 821 Ponies included a starter and generator, an instrument panel and gauges, fenders, a telescoping front axle, a drawbar, and rear-wheel weights. Options included a hand-lift attachment, a front tool-bar, a PTO, a belt-pulley, lights, extra rear-wheel weights, front-wheel weights, and bigger tires. During the period from 1951 to 1961, 1,823 Model 811 tractors were built in 1951 and 1952, 49,222 Model 812 tractors from 1952 to 1957, 31,277 Model 820 tractors from 1957 to 1961, and 9,395 Model 821 tractors from 1959 to 1961. 

THE MODEL 14 PONY  The Model 14 Pony was produced from 1951 to 1953. It was the industrial version of the Model 11 Pony and it had a fluid coupling ahead of the clutch that eliminated jerking starts and facilitated moving heavy loads such as airplanes, barges,or boxcars without straining the clutch. This fluid coupling was used in Chrysler cars and was advertised as “Fluid Drive.” The Model 14 was only available with an adjustable front axle. Only 74 Model 14 Ponies were built. In 1953, the Model 14 Pony was priced at $1,073.

THE MODEL 16 PACER  The Massey-Harris Model 16 Pacer was built from 1953 to 1955; it looked the same as a North American Pony, but it was six inches and 400 pounds heavier. The Model 16 Pacer had a heavy-duty, industrial, 91 cubic-inch, L-head, four-cylinder engine which operated at 1,000 and 1,800 RPM and produced 17 HP at the drawbar and 19 HP at the belt-pulley. Standard equipment included battery ignition, a starter, an instrument panel with gauges, independent rear brakes that could be locked together, a padded seat, a tool-box, a muffler, an adjustable front-axle,   and featured a live PTO as an option. The Model 16 Pacer was only available as a standard version with an adjustable width front axle, a drawbar, an air cleaner, a gas filter, an oil filter, rubber tires, and a hydraulic lift. A belt-pulley and a PTO were optional. The 1955 Model 16 Pacer was priced at $1,369. From 1953 to 1955, 2,767 Model 16 Pacers were produced.

Massey-Harris 22THE MODEL 22  The Model 22 was an updated Model 20; it was produced from 1948 to 1953. Like the Model 20, the Model 22 was a two-plow tractor available as either a standard or row crop tractor, with the option of a gasoline or distillate engine. The Model 22 had a heavy-duty, industrial, 140 cubic-inch, L-head, four-cylinder engine which was governed to run at 1,500 RPM’s for drawbar work and 1,800 RPM’s when using the belt pulley or road gear. This engine produced 22.87 HP at the drawbar and 31.05 HP at the belt-pulley. The Model 22 was the first  Massey-Harris tractor to offer a three-point hitch as an option. Standard equipment included a four-speed transmission, a hydraulic system, a starter, a muffler, a Velvet-Ride seat, and a swinging drawbar. Options included a hydraulic lift a three-point hitch, extra-long axles to provide a 112 inch tread, an hour meter a belt-pulley, a PTO, lights, a single front wheel, a high-arch adjustable front axle, rear-wheel weights, front-wheel weights, front-frame weights. In 1951, the standard version cost $1,461 and the row-crop version cost $1,434. From 1948 to 1953, 17,195 Model 22 tractors were built.

THE MODEL 21 COLT  The Massey-Harris Model 21 Colt was produced from 1952 to 1953; it was the Model 20 with updated styling. Standard and row-crop versions were available, with a choice of gasoline or distillate engines. The Model 21 had a heavy-duty, industrial, 124 cubic-inch, L-head, four-cylinder Continental engine that utilized gasoline, operated at 1,500 and 1,800 RPM, and produced 20.4 HP at the drawbar and 26.2 HP at the belt-pulley. The Model 21 Colt had an exhaust system that extended underneath the tractor. Standard equipment included rubber tires, a starter and generator, a thermostat, an instrument panel and gauges, an internal PTO shaft, an air cleaner, an oil filter, a hitch bracket, adjustable rear tread, a seat, and fenders. Options included a three-point hitch, a Velvet-Ride seat, an hour meter, a belt pulley, a PTO, lights, a grill-screen, front-frame weights, and rear-wheel weights. In 1955, the standard version was priced at $1,340, the row-crop version with a tricycle front end at $1,465, the row-crop version with a single front wheel at $1,486, and a row-crop version with an adjustable wide front axle at $1,505. The Model 21 Colt was only built in 1952 and 1953, during those two years, 1,669 tractors were produced. 

THE MODEL 23 MUSTANG  The Model 23 Mustang, built from 1952 to 1956, was based on the Model 22, with the same styling and engine as the Model 22. The Model 23 had a heavy-duty, industrial, 140 cubic-inch, L-head, four-cylinder Continental engine that utilized gasoline, operated at 1,500 and 1,800 RPM, and produced 22.87 HP at the drawbar and 31.05 HP at the belt-pulley. The Model 21 Colt and the Model 23 Mustang both had underneath exhausts. Buyers of the Model 23 Mustang had the option of gasoline or distillate-burning engines and tricycle, single-wheel or utility front-end configurations. Standard equipment included a three-speed transmission, a hydraulic system, rubber tires, a starter and generator, a thermostat, an instrument panel and gauges, an internal PTO shaft, an air cleaner, an oil filter, a muffler, a hitch bracket, adjustable rear tread, a seat, and fenders. Options included a three-point hitch, a Velvet-Ride seat, an hour meter, a belt pulley, a PTO, lights, a grill-screen, front-frame weights, and rear-wheel weights. In 1955, the standard version was priced at $1,466, the gasoline row-crop version with a tricycle front end at $1,616, the distillate row-crop version with a tricycle front end at $1,646, the gasoline row-crop version with a single front wheel at $1,635, and a gasoline row-crop version with an adjustable wide front axle at $1,635. From 1952 to 1956, 3,832 Model 23 Mustangs were built.   

THE MODEL 33  The Massey-Harris Model 33 replaced the Model 30 in late 1952. The Model 33 had a heavy-duty, industrial, 201 cubic-inch, L-head, four-cylinder, Model 201 Continental engine that utilized gasoline, operated at 1,500 and 1,800 RPM, and produced 35.5 HP at the drawbar and 39.5 HP at the belt-pulley. The Model 33 was available with kerosene/distillate engines and a few tractors were built with diesel engines. The Model 33 had a great deal of torque and was rated as a three-plow tractor. Row-crop or standard versions were available. Standard equipment included a five-speed transmission, rubber tires, fenders, a starter and generator, an instrument panel with gauges, an air cleaner, an oil filter, an internal PTO shaft, a drawbar, a seat, a toolbox, and lights. Options included a live PTO, a hydraulic system a three-point hitch, cast-center rear wheels, extra-long rear axles to achieve a 112-inch tread, a belt-pulley, lights, a high-arch front axle, a single front wheel, an hour meter, rear-wheel weights, and front-wheel weights. In 1955, a gas-powered standard version cost $2,135, a diesel-powered standard version cost $2810, a gas-powered row-crop version cost $2,095, and a diesel-powered row-crop version cost $2,770. The Model 33 was built between 1952 and 1955; a total of 11,607 were produced.

THE MODEL 333  The Massey-Harris Model 333 replaced the Model 33 in 1956. It featured a new paint design, chrome trim on the grill, and a dual-range transmission which allowed the operator to choose from ten forward speeds and two in reverse. The Model 333 was available as either a standard or row-crop version; it could be purchased with engines that were fueled by gasoline, diesel, distillate/kerosene, or LPG. The Model 333 was equipped with a heavy-duty, industrial, 208 cubic-inch, Model E208, four-cylinder Continental engine, which generated 39 HP at the drawbar and 44 HP at the belt-pulley and road gear when fueled with gasoline. With diesel fuel, the engine generated 35 HP at the drawbar and 39 HP at the belt-pulley and road gear. Standard equipment included lights, a 12-volt electrical system, a Velvet-Ride seat, a muffler, a PTO, an hour meter, and fenders. Optional equipment included a live PTO, a hydraulic lift, power steering, a single front wheel, a high-arch adjustable wide front axle, and cast-center rear wheels. The Model 333 was manufactured in 1956 and 1957. In, 1957, a standard Model 333 with a gasoline engine cost $2,413, a row-crop Model 333 with a diesel engine cost $2,963, a row-crop Model 333 with a gasoline engine cost $2,322, and a row-crop Model 333 with a diesel engine cost $2,872. The Model 333 was built in 1956 and 1957; during those two years, 2,748 tractors were produced.

Massey-Harris 44THE MODEL 44 (44-4)  The Massey-Harris Model 44 was the most popular and successful of all of the company’s tractors; it had an excellent reputation for dependability and reliability. This model was built from 1946 to 1953. The Model 44 was a three-plow tractor with either the Massey-Harris H260 four-cylinder engine or the Continental F226 four-cylinder engine--both overhead-valve engines. The Continental F226 engine was built exclusively for Massey-Harris; it was an overhead-valve engine witha displacement of 260 cubic-inches The Models 44 and 55 were the first tractors marketed by Massey-Harris which offered choices of gasoline, kerosene/distillate, diesel or LPG engines.The gasoline engine produced 39.9 HP at the drawbar and 45.6 HP for belt work or road gear; the kerosene engine produced 36.8 HP and 39.4 HP; and the diesel engine produced 37.9 HP and 43.04 HP. Standard equipment included a five-speed transmission, a starter and generator, a Velvet-Ride seat, a belt-pulley, a muffler, and flare fenders. Optional equipment included crown fenders (Standard version only); a hydraulic lift, Lights, a PTO, a single front wheel,a high-arch wide front axle, Bendix brakes, extra-long axles to achieve a 112-inch tread, an hour meter, rear-wheel weights, and front-wheel weights.

At first, the Model 44 was only offered in a standard configuration, with orchard, vineyard, and high-altitude variations. The orchard versions could be purchased with either gasoline or diesel engines; the vineyard and high-altitude versions were only available with gasoline engines. In 1952, a LPG engine offered for one year; it was a gasoline engine with a high-compression head. A row-crop version of the Model 44 was introduced in 1947. The Model 44 was the first Massey-Harris tractor to have a live PTO controlled by a hand clutch. In 1950, a hydraulic lift for mounted implements was added. The Model 44 had a three-point hitch, but no draft control. Model 44 vineyard tractors were much narrower than the other versions and the rear axles caused problems. They were recalled and destroyed. In 1951, the standard version was priced at $2,387, the price of the gasoline-powered row-crop version was $2,316, the price of the kerosene-powered row-crop version was $2,363, the price of the diesel row-crop version was $3,094; the price of the gasoline-powered orchard model was $2,504, and the price of the gasoline-powered vineyard version was $2,445. During the period from 1946 to 1953, 83,755 Model 44 tractors were produced--18,176 standard versions with gasoline engines, 32,889 row-crop versions with gasoline engines, 5,395 standard versions with diesel engines, 4,655 row-crop versions with diesel engines, 5,821 standard versions with kerosene engines, 3,202 row-crop versions with kerosene engines, 459 Model 44 tractors with liquid-propane-gas (LPG) engines--some standard versions and some row-crop, 30 vineyard versions with gasoline engines, 119 orchard versions with gasoline engines, 33 orchard models with diesel engines, 268 row-crop versions with hiigh-altitude gasoline engines, 64 standard versions with high-altitude engines, and 12,644 tractors unaccounted for.

THE MODEL 44-6  The Massey-Harris Model 44-6 retained the heavy-duty, industrial, 226 cubic-inch, L-head, six-cylinder Red Seal Continental engine that had been used in the Model 101 Senior. The 260 cubic-inch, four-cylinder, F226 Continental engine used in the Model 44 was more powerful and reliable than the six-cylinder engine used in the Model 44-6 and most farmers purchased the tractor with the four-cylinder engine. The Model 44-6 was only offered as a gasoline-fueled tractor, in standard and row-crop versions. The tractor was produced from 1947 to 1951. The Model 44-6 had the same standard and optional equipment as the Model 44. The price of a Massey-Harris Model 44-6 row-crop tractor was $2,178 in 1951. From 1946 to 1951, 6,657 Model 44-6 tractors were produced.

THE MODEL 44 SPECIAL (SP)  In 1953, the Model 44 was updated to the Model 44 Special (SP) with a heavy-duty, industrial, overhead-valve, four-cylinder, 277 cubic-inch, gasoline-fueled Model H277 Continental engine that generated 43.58 HP at the drawbar and 48.95 HP at the belt-pulley and road gear. A heavy-duty, industrial, overhead-valve, four-cylinder, 260 cubic-inch, Model H260 Continental engine was available to utilize gasoline, kerosene/distillate, diesel, or LPG fuel. The Model 44 Special was the only Massey-Harris model produced in high-crop and cane versions, as well as standard and row-crop versions. The Model 44 Special had the same standard and optional equipment as the Model 44, with the addition of a live PTO and a three-point hitch. In 1955, the price of the Model 44 Special standard gasoline-fueled tractor was $2,689, the price of the Model 44 Special standard diesel-fueled cane tractor was $4,536, the price of the Model 44 Special row-crop gasoline-fueled tractor was $2,681, the price of the Model 44 Special row-crop diesel-fueled tractor was $3,415, and the price of the Model 44 Special row-crop LPG-fueled tractor was $2,882. During the three-year period from 1953 to 1955, 10,719 Model 44 Specials were manufactured. 

THE MODEL 444  The Massey-Harris Model 444 replaced the Model 44 Special in 1956. Like the Model 333, the Model 444 featured a new paint design, chrome trim on the grill, and a dual-range transmission which allowed the operator to choose from ten forward speeds and two in reverse. The Model 444 was available as either a standard or row-crop version, and with engines that were fueled with gasoline, kerosene/distillate, diesel, or LPG. The Model 444 was equipped with a heavy-duty, industrial, 277 cubic-inch, Model E277, four-cylinder Continental engine, which generated 47 HP at the drawbar and 52 HP at the belt-pulley and road gear when fueled with gasoline. With liquid-propane-gas (LPG), the engine generated 46 HP at the drawbar and 51 HP at the belt-pulley and road gear. Standard equipment included lights, a 12-volt electrical system, a Velvet-Ride seat, a muffler, power-adjustable rear wheels, a PTO, an hour meter, and fenders. Optional equipment included a live PTO, a hydraulic lift, power steering, a single front wheel, a three-point hitch, a belt-pulley, a cigarette lighter, a rear safety rear-wheel weights, and front-wheel weights. The Model 444 was manufactured in 1956 and 1957. In 1957, a standard Model 444 with a gasoline engine cost $2,979, a row-crop Model 444 with a diesel engine cost $3.679, a row-crop Model 444 with a gasoline engine cost $2,919, and a row-crop Model 444 with a diesel engine cost $3,619. The Model 444 was produced from 1956 to 1958; during that time, 7,393 tractors were produced.

THE MODEL 55  The Massey-Harris Model 55 was a four/five-plow tractor built to replace Models 201, 202, and 203. The Model 55 was built from 1946 to 1955; it was advertised as the largest farm tractor on wheels and the world’s most powerful tractor. It was intended for use on the plains of Western Canada and the wheatlands of the United States. The tractor was only available as a standard version; however, western, riceland, hillside and high altitude specials were available based on the use of different engine heads and manifolds, different front axles, rear fenders, oversized tires, a higher compression ratio and a carburetor with smaller jets. At first, only gasoline and kerosene/distillate engines were available; diesel and liquid-propane-gas (LPG) engines were offered in 1949. The Model 55 had a heavy-duty, industrial, overhead-valve, four-cylinder Continental engine linked to a four-speed transmission. The gasoline version generated 60 HP on the drawbar and 68 HP on the belt-pulley and road gear; the diesel version produced 54 HP on the drawbar and 58 HP on the belt-pulley and road gear. Standard equipment included rubber tires, a starter and generator, a thermostat, an instrument panels with gauges, an internal PTO shaft, an air cleaner, an oil filter, a voltage regulator, and a drawbar. Options included lights, crown fenders, a PTO, and rear-wheel brakes.The tractor could be purchased with either hand-brakes or foot-brakes, and a hand-clutch instead of a foot-clutch. Unfortunately, the Model 55 had a number of mechanical problems—especially broken crankshafts. In 1951, a gas-powered version cost $3,214, a diesel-powered verson cost $4,142, a gasoline-powered riceland version cost $3,482, a diesel-powered riceland version cost $4,410, and a LPG-powered version cost $3,577. The Model 55 built from 1947 to 1956; a total of 21,931 tractors were produced duirng that time.

THE MODEL 555  The Massey-Harris Model 555 replaced the Model 55 Special in 1955. Like the Model 333 and the Model 444, the Model 555 featured a new paint design and chrome trim on the grill; however, unlike the Model 333 and Model 444, there was little difference between the Model 555 and the earlier Model 55. The Model 555  had the same engine and transmission as the Model 55. Standard equipment included rubber tires, a starter and generator, a thermostat, an instrument panels with gauges, an internal PTO shaft, an air cleaner, an oil filter, a voltage regulator, a foot-clutch, foot brakes, and a drawbar. Options included lights, crown fenders, a live PTO, a hand-clutch, and hand-brakes. The Model 555 were manufactured from 1955 to 1958. In 1956, a gas-powered version cost $3,736, a diesel-powered verson cost $4,511, a LPG-powered version cost $3,986, a gasoline-powered riceland version cost $4,204, a diesel-powered riceland version cost $4,979, a gasoline-powered Western Special cost $4,119, and a diesel-powered Western Special cost $4,894. A total of 3,794 Model 555  tractors were  produced during the period from 1955 to 1958.

THE MODEL 744  In 1947, Massy-Harris obtained a contract to supply tractors and implements to Great Britain. A plant was acquired in Manchester and Model 44 tractors were assembled there as Models 744 and 744D (diesel). The six-cylinder diesel engines were provided by the F. Perkins, Ltd., of Peterborough, England. Production was moved to Kilmarnock in 1949. The Model 744 was available in standard, row-crop, and half-track versions. The Massey-Harris tractors were not popular in Great Britain and relatively few were sold there; although, they experienced limited success in the export market. The Model 744 was replaced in 1954 by the Model 745, which had a Perkins L4 four-cylinder engine and an improved lift. Production of the Model 745 ended in 1958. During the period from 1948 to 1953, 16,606 Model 744 and 11,177 Model 745 and 745S tractors were built in England.

THE MASSEY-HARRIS-FERGUSON COMPANY  Massey-Harris merged with Ferguson in 1953 to form The Massey-Harris-Ferguson Company. This resulted in the company selling two competing lines of tractors. The company was renamed the Massey-Ferguson Company in 1958.

THE MODEL 50  After the merger, the Massey-Harris branch continued to offer basically the same line of tractors as those developed during the 1940’s. In 1955, the Ferguson Company introduced the Ferguson Model 40; the Model 40  with different sheet metal was sold by Massey-Harris dealers as the Massey-Harris Model 50. The Massey-Harris Model 50 was marketed from 1955 to 1957; from 1958 on, this tractor was sold as the Massey-Ferguson Model 50. From 1955 to 1957, 15,707 Model 50 tractors were produced. 

THE MODEL I-162  In 1953, the Massey-Harris Company contracted with the U.S. Army to build twenty-six tractors for use on air-bases to tow airplanes and for general utility work. These were designated as Model I-162 Military Tractors; they were based on the Massey-Harris Model 30. The Model I-162 was painted green and only produced for one year.

THE MODEL 1-244  The Model I-244 was manufactured by Massey-Harris for both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force. Model I-244 tractors were equpped with magnetic sweeps and used on air--bases and aircraft-carriers to pick up debris from runways. They were painted yellow. The Model I-244 was produced from 1955 to 1957; duriing that time, 708 were produced.

THE MODEL 303  In 1956, the Massey-Harris-Ferguson Company adapted the Massey-Harris Model 333 Standard and Model 44 Standard agricultural tractors to produce the Massey-Harris Model 303 Work Bull and Massey-Harris Model 404 Work Bull. The Model 303 and 404 were marketed as industrial tractors and they were painted yellow. The Model 303 was built from 1956 to 1959, with a production total of 987 tractors. The Model 404 was produced in 1956 and 1957, during which time 118 tractors were built. These tractors were not successful.

THE END OF THE LINE  The last true Massey-Harris tractors ended in 1958, with the end of the two-line policy. After that, tractors produced by the firm were based on the Ferguson line of tractors.

RESOURCES

Condie, Allan T. Massey Harris Album. Allan T. Condie Publications, 1988.

Dunning, Lorry. Ultimate American Farm Tractor Data Book; Nebraska Test Tractors 1920-1960. MBI, 1999.

Farnworth, John. The Advertising of Massey-Harris, Ferguson and Massey-Ferguson. Farming Press, 1999.

Farnworth, John. The Massey Legacy. 2 volumes. Japonica Press, 2001.

Farnworth, John. A World-Wide Guide to Massey-Harris, Ferguson and Early Massey-Ferguson Tractors. Japonica Press, 2000.

www.massey-harris.com

Oltrogge, Keith D. Massey Tractor Data Book. MBI, 1999.

 Pripps, Robert N., and Andrew Morland. The Big Book of Massey Tractors. Voyageur Press, 2006.

 Wendel, C.H. Encyclopedia of American Farm Tractors. Motorbooks International, 1992.

 Wendel, C.H. Nebraska Tractor Tests Since 1920. Motorbooks International, 1993.

 Wendel, C.H. Standard Catalog of Farm Tractors, 1890-1980. KP Books, 2005.

Williams, Michael. Massey-Ferguson Tractors. Bounty, 2005. (Massey-Harris tractors are included)